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#1 Sherman Duke

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 09:13 PM

:wub:



#2 Sherman Duke

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 10:54 AM

The tables here are dusty and musty from a lack of love and care. :(



#3 J0HN0

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 11:52 PM

Quite,

 

It's been slow on here for a while :(.

 

Just FYI an old friend & I tried playing rotation / 61 yesterday, it's a nice game, lots of safety and positional play at the start with all the balls on the table, then focus on shot-making at the end with the big value balls, we enjoyed it, a good alternative to the usual 8 / 9 ball..

 

regards,


J


#4 Sherman Duke

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 11:23 AM

I watched an old TV show with Jimmy Moore vs Irving Crane. The game was ten-twenty, a modified version of 14.1. A player breaks and the shooter tries to make ten balls, leaving it safe to end the inning. Any less and it continues until someone reaches ten. You are allowed one safety. A first scratch is a one point penalty.  A second and on is six points and a re-rack and a break. If time allows for a tenth frame the points are doubled. It's 14.1 designed for TV viewing. You can get short runs, defense, both players stay active. Irving won 20-19 after a second foul by Moore.



#5 J0HN0

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 09:40 PM

Flagrantly copied from Wikipedia,

Rotation (pool)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The appropriate rack for rotation from the racker's point of view; the 1 ball is at the apex of the rack and is on the foot spot, the 2 is in the corner to the racker's right, the 3 ball is in the left corner, and the 15 is in the center, with all other balls placed randomly, and all balls touching.

Rotation, sometimes called rotation pool or 61, is a pocket billiards game, requiring a standard pool table, cue ball and triangular rack of fifteen pool balls, in which the lowest-numbered object ball on the table must be always struck by the cue ball first, to attempt to pocket (pot) numbered balls for points.[1] Rotation is similar in many ways to nine-ball, but its scoring system is not unlike that of snooker and eight-ball.

As with nine-ball and other similar-format games, some attractions of rotation include performing unconventional or difficult shots to reach the correct ball, and quite often making risky attempts to score higher amounts of points by performing advanced shots such as combination shots (plants), bank shots (doubles) and swerves.

Rotation is a sport in the Asian Games and Southeast Asian Games.

Rotation is similar to fifteen-ball pool, except that in the latter a player can shoot at any object ball.

Rules

Object

The object of the game is to score the most points, by pocketing higher-scoring balls than the opponent(s). A frame (individual game) is won when a player or team reaches a number of points (usually 61) that makes it impossible for the opponent(s) to win.[1] A match may consist of multiple frames (e.g. a race to 10), or in multiple rounds of multiple frames (e.g. three rounds of best 2-out-of-three), as in other types of pool.

Scoring

Points are scored by pocketing the object balls on the table; the number of points awarded is equal to the number printed on the ball pocketed; for example, pocketing the 4 ball scores the player 4 points. In a two-player or -team game, the frame is over when a player or team has 61 or more points, although frames tied (drawn) at 60 points can occur (in which case the player who last legally pocketed a ball is credited with a bonus point and declared the winner). More than two players or teams can play, with the winning score being recalculated (whatever number will mathematically eliminate other players from outscoring the leader).[1] For example, the 61-point mark is determined by taking the sum of the values of all fifteen balls, 120, divided by number of players, 2, to yield 60, then adding 1 to ensure a definite winner (other than in the event of a tie at 60, for which see above).

Set up

At the beginning of each frame, the balls are racked in a triangle as in eight-ball and other games using fifteen object balls, but in particular with the 1 ball at the front (apex) of the rack, on the foot spot, the 2 ball on the right rear corner (from the vantage of the racker) and the 3 ball at the left rear corner (as in kelly pool), and the 15 ball – the one with the highest value – in the center; all other balls are placed randomly, and all balls must be touching.[1] In informal British play, it is common to push the rack forward farther so that the 15 ball, still in the center of the rack, is resting on the foot spot. (See illustration at top of article.)

Game play

The primary rule of the game is that the lowest numbered object ball on the table at any time is the "ball-on" and must be struck first (including on the break shot – a side break is a foul), regardless of the player's intentions of which ball to actually pocket. Players may use the lowest numbered ball to pocket other (e.g. higher value) balls. Consequently, this not being a call-shot game, points are also counted if a ball is unintentionally but legally pocketed (a "fluke" or "slop shot"). A player's turn at the table continues until a shot fails to legally pocket a ball, a foul is committed, or the frame concludes. Illegally pocketed balls are spotted.[1]

Safeties

Safety play is rather strictly limited in rotation. If a player legally pockets a ball, that player must shoot again; unlike in many games, there is no provision for a called, intentional safety play that pockets a ball. Safeties that consist of simply using the cue ball to drive the ball-on to the closest cushion, without contacting another object ball in the course of the shot, are limited to only two such shots per player per frame. Other safeties are unlimited, provided that the lowest numbered ball is of course struck first and either at least two object balls move in the course of the shot, or the ball-on is driven to a cushion that is not the closest to it.[1]

Fouls

If a foul is committed (other than a foul break or cue ball foul, as detailed below), the incoming opponent may either take the next shot or require the opponent to do so, with all balls as they lie in either case. If the exiting opponent's foul was scratching the cue ball into a pocket or off the table, the incoming player's shot is necessarily ball-in-hand, and must be taken from behind the head string (in baulk), although the incoming player may optionally require the fouling opponent to shoot again instead, with ball-in-hand behind the headstring. Shots taken from behind the head string must cause the cue ball to cross the head string; however, if the ball-on is behind the head string, the player with ball in hand (including a fouling player who has been forced to take the shot by the opponent) may optionally have that ball spotted on the foot spot before shooting. There is no point penalty for fouls Three consecutive fouls (i.e. on three consecutive turns at the table) by the same player is a loss of frame.[1]

Fouls include:[1]

  • Failure to hit the lowest-numbered object ball first (or at all)
  • Failure to make an open break on the break shot (incoming player may either accept the object balls as they lie and take cue ball in-hand behind the headstring and shoot from there, or demand a re-rack and shoot a new break shot)
  • Scratching the cue ball into a pocket or off the table (incoming player has ball-in-hand behind the headstring, though may force the fouling opponent to shoot)
  • Failure to either legally pocket an object ball, or drive any ball to a cushion
  • Knocking an object ball off the table (it is spotted; balls legally pocketed on the shot are not)
  • A third or subsequent one ball safety to the closest cushion (see above)

Team play

Two-player doubles (or larger) teams compete by alternating teams and alternating players within each team. For example, if teams consist of players 1 and 2 versus players 3 and 4, and player 1 breaks, turns alternate in the pattern 1 (breaking), 3, 2, 4, 1, 3, 2, 4, etc. I.e., the ending of a player's turn at the table ends that team's turn at the table. As in individual competition, a player's turn at the table does not end until a foul is committed or the player fails to legally pocket an object ball (or the frame ends).

Three consecutive fouls by a team player disqualifies that player for the remainder of the frame (i.e., if player 3 were disqualified in the above example, then subsequent play order would be 4, 1, 2, 4, 1, 2, etc.) Balls that were legally pocketed by the disqualified player are not spotted.[1]

Informally, team play can also be conducted in scotch doubles format. However, the disqualification rule does not apply, and three consecutive fouls by the team are a loss of frame (otherwise, the team with the hypothetically disqualified player would have an advantage, in no longer having to coordinate two players).

 

Regards,

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J


#6 Sherman Duke

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Posted 14 October 2016 - 09:20 PM

Cribbage (pool)
Source: http://en.wikipedia....Cribbage_(pool)
Updated: 2016-03-27T06:31Z
For the card game of the same name, see Cribbage.
200px-Cribbage_pool_rack_big_view.jpg
Setting up a game of cribbage with the triangle rack.

Cribbage, sometimes called cribbage pocket billiards, cribbage pool, fifteen points and pair pool, is a two-player pocket billiards game that, like its namesake card game, has a scoring system which awards points for pairing groups of balls (rather than playing cards) that total 15. Played on a standard pool table, participants who pocket a ball of a particular number are required to immediately pocket the companion ball that tallies to 15 when added to the prior ball's number. The goal is to score 5 paired cribbages out of a possible 8, with the exception that the last ball, required to be the 15 ball, is not paired but alone counts as 1 cribbage.[1][2]

Gameplay (Billiard Congress of America) Set-up

At the start of cribbage, a standard set of fifteen pool balls are racked at the foot end of a pool table, with the apex ball of the rack centered over the foot spot and the 15 ball placed at the rack's center. All other balls are placed randomly except that no two of the three corner balls may total to fifteen.[2] Such an open-ended racking rule is unusual in that most pool games require particular balls to be placed at the corners of the rack and sometimes in fixed positions inside the rack as well. The arrangement thus results in 134,120,448,000 possible racking patterns (14 × 12 × 10 × 2 × 11!).[1][3]

200px-Cribbage_pool_rack_closeup.jpg
A cribbage rack: The 15 in the middle, apex ball on the foot spot, and no two corner balls adding up to fifteen.

An open break is required in cribbage, meaning that on the break either a ball must be pocketed or at least four balls must be driven to rails (as opposed to a safety break such as used, for example, in straight pool and one-pocket). The object of the game is to score 5 cribbages out of a possible 8 in a full rack of 15 balls.[1][2][4]

Cribbages

A cribbage is a pair of numbered balls which, when added together, total to 15 points. A cribbage only lies where the two partner balls forming the cribbage are each legally made, i.e., where no foul is committed on the same strokes that pocket the balls, or the shot is otherwise deemed illegal. The one exception to pairing is the 15 ball, which itself becomes a cribbage but only once all other object balls of the rack have been pocketed. Thus, not including the 15 ball, the available cribbages are the 1-14, 2-13, 3-12, 4-11, 5-10, 6-9 and 7-8.[1][2][3]

Rules of play

A cribbage only counts when the paired balls are pocketed in succession in the same inning. Where a player pockets a first paired ball and is thus on a cribbage, if the companion ball is not pocketed on the next stroke, the shot is a foul and the unpaired balls of any cribbages not completed are spotted to the foot spot. If the foot spot is occupied, balls are spotted as close as possible to the foot spot on the long string stretching back from the foot spot to the foot rail.[1][2][3]

The penalty for all fouls is the ending of the player's inning; no points are lost, and the incoming player has the option of shooting from position or taking cue ball in hand from the kitchen (behind the table's head string). In older rules a foul was a loss of one point. Three successive fouls in cribbage is a loss of game. Pocketing the 15 ball when it is not the last ball on the table is not a foul. Instead it is immediately spotted and play continues without penalty.[1][2][5][6]

When players pocket more than one ball on a single stroke at any time, a situation often arising on the break shot, they may shoot at any companion balls, but must pocket each in succession in any order. If incidental balls are pocketed on the same stroke that a cribbage is completed, they add to the succession of cribbages the player is "on". When a player fouls by failing to pocket an unpaired cribbage while on a succession of unpaired balls, only unpaired balls are spotted; the prior successful cribbages count toward the score.[2][3]

Normal ball and rail foul rules apply in cribbage. This is a requirement present in most pool games that a player must contact an object ball with the cue ball and after that contact, either pocket an object ball, or some ball including the cue ball must contact a rail. When a foul results from scratching the cue ball into a pocket or jumping it off the table, the player has cue ball in hand from the kitchen. When a player has cue ball in hand from the kitchen and all object balls are also behind the head string in the kitchen, a player has the option of having the object ball nearest the head string relocated to the foot spot. If in this situation two or more object balls are equidistantly closest to the head string, the player may designate which ball is to be relocated.[2][5]

References
  1. ^ a b c d e f Shamos, Michael Ian (1993). The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Billiards. New York, NY: Lyons & Burford. pp. 56, 63 and 161. ISBN 1-55821-219-1.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h BCA Rules Committee (November 1992). Billiards - the Official Rules and Record Book. Iowa City, Iowa: Billiard Congress of America. pp. 120–122. ISBN 1-878493-02-7.
  3. ^ a b c d Fels, George (2000). Pool Simplified, Somewhat. Mineola, New York: Courier Dover Publications. pp. 88–89. ISBN 0-486-41368-3.
  4. ^ Ewa Mataya Laurance and Thomas C. Shaw (1999). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Pool & Billiards. New York, NY: Alpha Books. p. 238. ISBN 0-02-862645-1.
  5. ^ a b Billiard Congress America (1995–2005). General rules of pocket billiards: Rules 3.10, 3.18 and 3.19. Retrieved March 15, 2007.
  6. ^ BCA Rules Committee (1970). Official Rule Book For All Pocket and Carom Billiard Games. Chicago, Illinois: Billiard Congress of America. p. 58. ISSN 1047-2444. OCLC 30454628.
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#7 Sherman Duke

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 06:09 PM

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#8 Sherman Duke

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 01:49 PM

https://www.youtube....h?v=AJWBthmM4DI

 

Some of the sickest, nastiest shots ever.



#9 atillman

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:37 PM

https://www.youtube....h?v=AJWBthmM4DI

 

Some of the sickest, nastiest shots ever.

 

 

thank you for posting this link



#10 Pin

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 09:13 AM

Will have a look soon - on holiday at the moment and just about to take the dogs out.

Hey, did anyone hear what happened to Wonderdog and the pack? I hope they're being taken care of.






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